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Fluco Toolbox: Twitter Archiver

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based on your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to create an archived collection of tweets on a trending topic? What about a conference? Love Tweetdeck, but hate scrolling down through all the images and GIFs? Or maybe you just love looking at tweet data.

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Twitter Archiver

First, the basics:

Name: Twitter Archiver
URL: Link here
Cost: FREE w/ Premium option ($29 yearly)
Problem this tool solves: Use this Google Sheets add-on to archive tweets on a trending topic or hashtag. Customize fetch rules to limit based on language, mentions, user, and more.

Twitter Archiver is a Google Sheets add-on that’s very handy to capture tweets based on a series of rules. It has both a free and premium side, each with their own pros and cons. This tool is a great way to capture Twitter updates when Tweetdeck isn’t the preferred option. Twitter Archiver removes the images and GIFs so that the tweet and links are the priority. Bonus: it works in the background even when the computer is off so the file is constantly being updated!

Before I jump into how to use the tool, I want to share a comparison of the free and premium versions. We all love free, and for most educators, this will be the best option. However, those who follow a lot of conference or popular educational hashtags may prefer the $29 per year premium option instead.

The free version allows the user to create one rule for fetching tweets. This rule can be edited and changed over time, allowing the user to pull different hashtags in as needed. Because of this, it is best for the user to have one Spreadsheet named Twitter Archiver. A new tab is created for each new rule, and old tabs can be deleted when no longer necessary. The free version fetches tweets every hour and is supposed to be limited to 100 tweets. However, my test run of this with a trending hashtag showed that it was able to pull in over 2k the first round, and over 300 the second time.

Upgrading to premium does cost $29 per year. With premium, new tweets are fetched every 15 minutes, allowing you to stay on top of the most recent tweets. It also does not limit to 100 per hour. Multiple rules can be created, which means that the user is not limited to using just one spreadsheet for Twitter Archiver. Finally, technical support is free for 60 days.

To begin using Twitter Archiver, use the link above to add the add-on to your Google Sheets. Open a new Sheets file, and name the file Twitter Archiver. In the ribbon at the top, go to “Add-ons” and select “Twitter Archiver”. The first time the add-on is used, you will be asked to authorize Google to connect to your Twitter account.

Follow the steps above again, this time selecting “Create Rule”.

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Fill in the parameters for the rule. If you are only wanting hashtags, do not add the # symbol to your parameters.

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Note: Mine is set to Manage, as I’d already created an original rule prior to this post. Your screen will look similar to mine.

Once the rule has been created, the Google Sheet will have a tab for a Log and a tab for the rule. As more rules are created (or the original updated), new tabs will be added.

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The tab that houses all of the archived tweets looks like the image below. It is much easier to scroll through and read tweets on a topic without pictures, and with a more compressed look and feel. It is also easier to sort the tweet data, or search for keywords that appear over and over again.

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That’s all there is to it! Don’t forget to manage and update the original file if you are a free user. I love the data this thing collects, but I’m a big dork for all that fun data stuff, too. I plan to use this in the future for conferences because I’m able to see more information at once. Happy tweeting!

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: Tall Tweets

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based on your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to make a GIF of your Slides presentation? Ever wished you had a few sample images to advertise your upcoming workshop? Just like GIFs?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Tall Tweets

First, the basics:

Name: Tall Tweets
URL: http://www.talltweets.com
Cost: FREE
Problem this tool solves: Create GIFs of a Google Slides presentation. Use these GIFs for auto-running presentations, to advertise a presentation, or even to highlight the key points of a presentation. This tool also allows the user to tweet high quality images of individual slides.

Despite its name, Tall Tweets does more than just work with Twitter. It’s a handy tool that can be utilized to create a GIF from a Google Slides presentation. Choose to highlight key slides, or create a GIF of the entire presentation.

To begin, go to the website listed above. The first step is to connect a Google account to the website. This allows Tall Tweets to access Slides presentations stored in Drive. Then click the “Select Presentation” button.

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Search Drive for the desired presentation. Tall Tweets includes all presentations that have been shared with the user, so it’s a good idea to have the name of the Slides file in mind when searching.

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Click the desired presentation and then “Select”. Tall Tweets will import the presentation to the website. This may take some time, especially if the presentation file is large in size.

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Once the presentation has been loaded, the user has two options – Create a GIF and Tweet Slides. To create a GIF, fill in the information in the Create a GIF box. Choose the image width for the GIF, what slides to feature, and how long each slide appears. Then click “Create GIF”. A preview of the GIF will appear just to the right, where it can be saved to the computer or tweeted. There is also an option to select a different presentation with the “Change” button.

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Users can also tweet individual slides at high quality. Switch to “Tweet Slides” by clicking the gray box just below the “Make a GIF” one. Each individual slide will be loaded as an image, and can be saved or tweeted directly from the page. To use Twitter, permission must be given to connect the site to a Twitter account. The only part I did not like about the tweeting section was that it did not pull any info from Twitter, such as alerting if a user was correctly tagged. If you are tagging individuals, make sure to know their handles, as Tall Tweets does not auto-predict.

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If you often present or share ideas with others, this is a great tool to try. Try it the next time you are sharing conference or presentation information.

Resources