google slides

Fluco Toolbox: Tall Tweets

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based on your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to make a GIF of your Slides presentation? Ever wished you had a few sample images to advertise your upcoming workshop? Just like GIFs?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Tall Tweets

First, the basics:

Name: Tall Tweets
URL: http://www.talltweets.com
Cost: FREE
Problem this tool solves: Create GIFs of a Google Slides presentation. Use these GIFs for auto-running presentations, to advertise a presentation, or even to highlight the key points of a presentation. This tool also allows the user to tweet high quality images of individual slides.

Despite its name, Tall Tweets does more than just work with Twitter. It’s a handy tool that can be utilized to create a GIF from a Google Slides presentation. Choose to highlight key slides, or create a GIF of the entire presentation.

To begin, go to the website listed above. The first step is to connect a Google account to the website. This allows Tall Tweets to access Slides presentations stored in Drive. Then click the “Select Presentation” button.

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Search Drive for the desired presentation. Tall Tweets includes all presentations that have been shared with the user, so it’s a good idea to have the name of the Slides file in mind when searching.

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Click the desired presentation and then “Select”. Tall Tweets will import the presentation to the website. This may take some time, especially if the presentation file is large in size.

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Once the presentation has been loaded, the user has two options – Create a GIF and Tweet Slides. To create a GIF, fill in the information in the Create a GIF box. Choose the image width for the GIF, what slides to feature, and how long each slide appears. Then click “Create GIF”. A preview of the GIF will appear just to the right, where it can be saved to the computer or tweeted. There is also an option to select a different presentation with the “Change” button.

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Users can also tweet individual slides at high quality. Switch to “Tweet Slides” by clicking the gray box just below the “Make a GIF” one. Each individual slide will be loaded as an image, and can be saved or tweeted directly from the page. To use Twitter, permission must be given to connect the site to a Twitter account. The only part I did not like about the tweeting section was that it did not pull any info from Twitter, such as alerting if a user was correctly tagged. If you are tagging individuals, make sure to know their handles, as Tall Tweets does not auto-predict.

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If you often present or share ideas with others, this is a great tool to try. Try it the next time you are sharing conference or presentation information.

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: SlidesCarnival

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based on your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever gotten bored of the available Google Slides themes or the PowerPoint templates available by default? Used the same template or theme over and over again?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Slides Carnival

First, the basics:

Name: SlidesCarnival
URL: http://www.slidescarnival.com
Cost: FREE
Problem this tool solves: Provides a large variety of free themes and templates that work for both Google Slides and Microsoft PowerPoint presentations. Each one includes a variety of slide types, suggestions for the slides, and even some icons, too.

Today’s Fluco Toolbox is simple, yet it can add so much variety to presentations you may make in the future. SlidesCarnival is a nifty website that hosts a variety of free templates and themes for both PowerPoint and Slides. The goal of the site is to help the user create visually memorable presentations for audiences.

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The site is easy to use and navigate. Themes and templates are categorized in the gray bar at the top of the screen. Choose one to begin. Templates/themes can also be searched for as well. Once a category has been selected, scroll down to view the available options.

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Click on the title of the theme to go to its informational page. Scroll down to read a description of the template and what type of slides are included. at the very bottom is a preview of the template, allowing the user to click through the slides and check out the options.

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All the user has to do is select whether or not to download it in Slides or PowerPoint by clicking the corresponding button. Google Slides will open a new Slides presentation. It DOES NOT save the theme to the Themes section. PowerPoint is the same way.

Once the template is loaded, create a brand new presentation, and make sure the audience remembers it! Need help? SlidesCarnival has this nifty FAQ to help answer common questions.

Resources

EdtechRVA Recap: Get Interactive with Google Apps

Yesterday I had the privilege to attend EdtechRVA in Richmond, VA. This is hosted by the Greater Richmond Area Education Technology Consortium (GRAETC), and is a one day conference for folks interested in educational technology. It was hosted at Virginia Commonwealth University this year, and quite a variety of passionate educators showed up. It was my first time going, and I was able to pick up quite a bit. I also talked about hyperdocs to some folks, and saw familiar faces from VSTE.

There will be a few blogs that recap the sessions I went to, and these will be denoted with “EdtechRVA Recap” in the title. I can’t say how long it’ll take me to get them done, but when I finish the last post, I’ll make readers aware.

The first session I attended focused on Getting Interactive with Google Apps. Being new to Google this year, and a lover of hyperdocs, I was hoping to find some new tips and tricks for myself. By the end of the session, I’d found both. This particular session was hosted by Wendy Seger from Chesterfield County Public Schools. She works with a K-5 population, but you can certainly take her ideas here and modify to meet the needs of older students as well. She can be found on Twitter as well: @WendySeger.

She focused on taking ideas from interactive white board apps, and integrating them into Google Apps, particularly Slides. The idea itself seems like it should have been pretty obvious, but it was not. Just like with PowerPoint, Google Slides allows you to edit a master slide template. What this means is that you can use the master slide template to create slides that have locked down features that students cannot move. This is helpful when creating an interactive sort. Presentations that utilize the master slide template will only have certain pieces that can be moved, which means students won’t mess up the entire layout.

Students cannot complete activities like this in presentation mode, however. They must be in the regular editing view. The best part is that sort activities can be combined with other lesson activities, and I’m sure it would marry well with hyperdocs, especially the ones created in Slides from the beginning.

Teachers who create activities in Slides can send out the work via Google Classroom, and have set the assignment to make a copy for each student. Students can then complete the work and turn in to the teacher for grading or comprehension.

The best part was that Wendy shared many already created resources for K-5 classrooms. There are instructions to explain how to create an interactive Slides, templates, and sample activities ready to go. I mean, it’s pretty crazy the amount of stuff that is in this folder for teachers to use.

Check it out for yourself. Remember if you do use though, please give credit where credit is due. After all, she did make this whole folder free and I highly support the free sharing of resources.

Keep an eye out for the next update on EdtechRVA!