Google Chrome

Fluco Toolbox: Managing the Chrome Bookmarks Bar

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based on your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever added a lot of bookmarks to the bookmarks bar in your Chrome browser, and later couldn’t find what you needed? Do you just have a lot of bookmarks in general, and need a way to get them organized?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Managing the Chrome Bookmarks Bar

First, the basics:

Name: Managing the Chrome Bookmarks Bar
URL: N/A
Cost: N/A
Problem this tool solves: Create folders and an organization system for the Chrome bookmarks bar and bookmarks in general.

Over time, we tend to amass a lot of bookmarks. Even with monitoring and deleting unnecessary bookmarks, a lot can still accumulate. Scrolling through a long list can become tedious, and it can be hard to find that one particular bookmark. It becomes even more frazzling when you only want important links to appear in the bookmarks bar, but have more links than visual retail space.

We’ve all been there before, but there’s a way to organize bookmarks with folders so that links are grouped into folders and sub-folders on the bookmarks bar. Here’s an example using my own bookmarks:

 

bookmarks1

As you can see, my bookmarks bar shows folders of different topics. I then use a folder tree system to organize further. Here we see I have a folder for Minecraft items, and then within that folder, I have folders for things such as Tutorials, Reference Materials, and Mods/Texture Packs. If I hover over those sub-folders, then I can find my links. Sub-folders aren’t necessary; I could have left all of my Minecraft links in the Minecraft folder and called it a day. No matter the system used, I have made it so that my bookmarks bar shows all of my important topics. I have increased the amount of visual retail space!

Let’s get started. First, access the bookmarks manager by clicking the three vertical dots in the upper right area of your Chrome browser. Then go to Bookmarks, and Bookmark manager. This can also be accessed with the following shortcut: CTRL+Shift+O

bookmarks2.png

You’ll now see something similar to the following:

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Instead of it being organized, you’ll simply see all bookmarks that you have saved. Let’s take a look at creating new folders. Look at the content you have already saved, and see if similar topics have been saved. As a teacher, you might find subject-specific links. You might decide to make a folder for your subject, to begin with.

Go ahead and click the 3 vertical dots in the upper right area of the Bookmarks screen. Click the option to add a new folder. Give the folder a name. Drag the folder to appear under the Bookmarks bar folder on the left side of the screen. This folder will now appear in your Bookmarks bar.

Continue to use the navigation pane on the left. Drag any bookmarks into the appropriate folder. Create more folders for other topics as you see fit. If you feel that you need folders within folders, you can do that as well! Follow the same steps used to create a folder above, and then drag the folder to the folder it should appear inside.

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A completed folder system for bookmarks for Minecraft.

If you’re a Fluvanna staff member (or a staff member of any district), chances are you have a lot of important links for the district. Instead of just adding each individual link to the bookmarks bar, why not create a folder for these links? That way when you click on the folder in the bookmarks bar, all of the important school links will appear.

The next time you bookmark a website, make sure you select the proper folder. Click the star in the omnibox and in the window that pops up, make sure to select the appropriate folder in the drop-down menu. If the folder doesn’t appear there, then select “Choose another folder” and select from all of your created folders.

 

Creating a bookmarks system requires that every now and then you do check and make sure you have usable links and make new folders as needed. However, this system will allow you to easily access more of your bookmarks more quickly, thus saving time and frustration!

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: Extract Pages from a PDF

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever opened a PDF document and needed to extra just a few pages from it into a separate file? Tried to upload a large PDF as a resource, when you only needed one page and had the site tell you the file is too large?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Extract a Page from a PDF

First, the basics:

Name: Extract a Page from a PDF
URL: n/a
Cost: n/a
Problem this tool solves: Easily use this trick to extract one page from a PDF and save as its own file instead.

Today’s Fluco Toolbox is more of a trick than a tool, but it is a handy one at that. One weekend, my wife was trying to upload documentation from her recent Army Reserves drill. She had a copy of the sign in roster. The file was a PDF, and included 26 pages of soldiers who had signed in during the 4 day drill. She really only needed page 16, the one that showed her own attendance each day. When she tried to upload the entire file, the website told her the file was too large. I stepped in and began researching, thinking there had to be a way, and turns out, there is!

When you think of working with PDFs, you might think you would certainly need the paid version of Adobe Acrobat to extract a page. It would certainly seem like it, especially since this can’t be done with the free version. However, all you really need is your Google Chrome browser.

First, open Google Chrome. Open a new tab if you wish; it doesn’t matter. Then press CTRL + O on the keyboard. This shortcut will open the Open File window. Locate the PDF you wish to use and open it.

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Next, locate the printer icon in the upper right. Chrome sometimes hides this bar, but as long as you hover your mouse on the screen, it will appear.

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Once the printer dialog box is open, change the destination to print to. Typically, the default printer for your device appears, but when you change the destination, the option you are looking for is “Save as PDF”. Next, type in the page/s you would like to extract. Make sure you have looked at your PDF in advance to make this easier.

Finally, click “Save” and choose a new location for your PDF file on your computer. Once you’ve done that, confirm the save, and then you are set.

Save this trick for a rainy day. Life becomes a lot easier when you can create a separate PDF of only the pages you need from a large one!

Resources